Welcome to Digital Humanities Applied!

ENGL 482/502 Slaves in Minnesota: Narrate, Curate, Exhibit

and

HIST 480/580 Slaves in Minnesota: Making a Museum Exhibit

Logistics

Dr. Betsy Glade

Office: SH 283

Phone: 320.308-2004

Office Hours:
9–12 TR

Dr. Sharon Cogdill

Office: Area 51, Office 159

Phone: 320.308-4229

Office Hours
:

Student-Learning Outcomes

For HIST 4/580

Students will

  1. explore the historiography of a topic/era in the history of the Western hemisphere.
  2. read and discuss texts on the history of the region, including those dealing with politics, economics, culture, religion, conflict, race, and/or social issues.
  3. identify, read, and analyze primary and secondary sources in the given topic or era in the history of an area or all of the Americas.
  4. conduct primary and/or secondary research in a topic in this region of the world.
  5. write and present research projects to the class.

For ENGL 482/502

Students will

  1. develop and express empathy for figures from the past: “Perceive events and issues as they were experienced by people at the time, to develop historical empathy as opposed to present-mindedness” (“Habits of Mind”)
  2. formulate research questions, do primary and secondary research and present the findings of their research in written and spoken discourse.
  3. situate texts in historical, rhetorical, social/political, ethical, and other contexts.
  4. lead and participate in classroom activities and discussions.
  5. write and organize the text, identify images and curate links for the construction of a digital exhibit.
  6. work collaboratively to do the research, the writing, revising and editing, and the construction of the content of the exhibit.
  7. analyze the rhetorical situation, synthesize the content, choose images and artifacts and manage paragraph- and sentence-level concerns in written assignments.
  8. explore the historiography of slavery in the American West in the 1850s.
  9. read and discuss texts on the history of the 19th century American West, including those dealing with politics, economics, culture, religion, conflict, race, and/or social issues.

Course Policies

Discourse

Conduct

Integrity: Please be aware of the rights and responsibilities defined for students at St. Cloud State University in the Student Handbook (http://www.stcloudstate.edu/studenthandbook/code/default.asp). In particular, please know that we take academic integrity very seriously; it is addressed directly in the Student Code of Conduct, particularly in the list of prohibited conduct. First in the list of conduct that is prohibited is

Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation of student status, and resume falsification. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotation, the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment; unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in selling or otherwise providing term papers or other academic materials; and commercialization, sale or distribution of class notes without the instructors' permission. (http://www.stcloudstate.edu/studenthandbook/code/prohibited.asp)

Attendance Policy: The following attendance policy is an English-department official policy:

The English Department agrees that regular attendance is expected in all of its classes. In classes at both the undergraduate and graduate level, students not only turn in finished papers or complete tests that demonstrate their command of course content and their achievement of class goals, but they engage in a variety of activities that earn them university credit for the course. These activities include discussion and analysis of texts, exploration of ideas, small group or collaborative activities, and presentation of material by the teacher or students that is not readily available in a textbook. Thus, the English Department has a policy that if a student misses 20 percent of the course's regular class meetings, then the student will not receive a passing grade for the course.

Depending on the circumstances, the student will receive an F, I or W if he/she misses the three classes during Fall or Spring terms in a class that meets once a week.

Projects

  1. Crowdsourcing Projects (General + Wikipedia)
  2. Reflections on Practice (students write reflections -> class discussion guided toward analysis and interpretation, evaluation and creation -> written substantive postings recording discussion findings and most important ideas in the classroom discussion)
  3. Doing Research (Archival and Online)
  4. Doing Historical Thinking
  5. Deconstructing Slave Literature
  6. Making a Digital Edition
  7. Writing a Digital Exhibit about Slavery in St. Cloud (Table of Contents, Content [web pages], Permissions, Curation [e.g., links], Usability Testing). Tools: Omeka, Dreamweaver.
  8. Presentation and transmittal documents
  9. Updated resume or c.v.

Possible Schedule

  1. Crowd Sourcing: finding a project and contributing to one of the transcription crowd-sourcing projects; reflection. Wikipedia: editing, analysis of rhetorical situation.
  2. Locating texts in their context: integrating historiography (19th-century texts) and rhetorical analysis (audience, purpose, writer).
  3. Assembling, analyzing, evaluating and interpreting evidence.
  4. Writing: integrating writing history and constructing subjectivity.
  5. Building an exhibit: Omeka, working with designers, working with the client (Stearns History Museum), building the prototype, preparing for usability analysts. Collaborative project, using a design and with usability testing done at SCSU.

Readings and Resources

Topics to Discuss


Schedule

Thursday, 8 January

In Class

  1. Exploring the jobs posted in DH, where they are, the credentials and qualifications required, also the trend in those jobs.
  2. Disciplines and interdisciplines: history, rhetoric, and digital humanities. Research practices: primary, secondary, bibliographic and online research. Case in point: slave narratives.
    1. Historiography: Columbus
  3. Introducing our project, "They Have Names" (overview page is here)
  4. Introducing Wordpress and our Wordpress blog, They Have Names
  5. Annotating pdfs

Due Next Week

  1. Read the They Have Names blog, taking a look at the raw materials we'll be working with.
  2. Begin reading Michael Morrison's Slavery and the American West.
  3. Begin reading Chris Lehman's

Thursday, 15 January

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 22 January

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 29 January

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 5 February

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 12 February

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 19 February

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 26 February

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 5 March

In Class

Due after Spring Break

Thursday, 12 March: Spring Break

Thursday, 19 March

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 26 March

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 2 April

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 9 April

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 16 April

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 23 April

In Class

Due Next Week

Thursday, 30 April

In Class

Due Next Week: Presentation of website, goals and outcomes to the client and various stakeholders within SCSU (Dr. Lehman, Dr. Kilborn, Dr. Robinson, Stearns History Museum, the Digital Humanities Group [Keith Ewing, Melissa Prescott, Jennifer Quinlan, Gordie Schmitt, Tina Gross, Matt Barton]).

Thursday, 7 May, 6:30–9:00: Final Exam, same room


Last update: November 17, 2014